August 6th, 2019

Singh Pitches a New Deal for Healthcare in Nanaimo

NANAIMO – People in Nanaimo continue to make sacrifices to be able to afford the prescriptions they need. That’s why NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says the NDP’s New Deal for Healthcare includes a pharmacare system to provide prescription drug coverage and expands Medicare to cover dental care, mental health care, eye care and hearing care.

“Nothing is more important than your family’s health,” said Singh. “But the Liberals have been focused on making life easier for wealthy pharmaceutical companies, holding back expansions of medicare to cover the medicine families need. And the Conservatives have now vowed to keep Stephen Harper’s cuts to health care in place — underfunding that would make health care worse every single year. We will make different choices. New Democrats will implement a comprehensive pharmacare system so that regardless of your job situation – you just need your health card – not your credit card – at the pharmacy.”

Harper’s Conservatives cut healthcare transfers to the provinces, Justin Trudeau maintained the Conservatives’ cuts, and last week Andrew Scheer promised to maintain those cuts, creating a $31 billion shortfall across Canada over 10 years. Elizabeth May’s focus has never been health care, and she says implementing pharmacare should wait for years.

“People in Nanaimo are struggling to afford their medication. In the meantime, the Liberals and Conservatives are fighting over who is best to shrink your healthcare services,” added Bob Chamberlin, NDP candidate for Nanaimo – Ladysmith. “Our New Deal for Healthcare will save your family more than $500 a year, even if you already have insurance.”

New Democrats will begin working with the provinces right away to target a late 2020 start date, with an annual federal investment of $10 billion.

Key facts

  • Under the Liberals, Canada’s social spending is among the lowest in the industrialized world – even lower than it was in the 1990s.
  • The Liberals met with big pharma and insurance companies more than 700 times and have received more than $30,000 since they’ve been elected.
  • Canada is the only industrialized country in the world with universal healthcare that doesn’t cover medication.
  • Nearly two million Canadians reported not being able to afford one or more drugs in the past year, often resulting in additional doctor visits and hospital admissions.
  • Hundreds of premature deaths occur each year among working age Canadians unable to afford their prescription medications.